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      From The Nest

      Soaring Car Sales In China Increase Nitrile Glove Price

      A recent article in Bloomberg reported the raw material costs of nitrile gloves have jumped 45% since September 2016.

      The auto industry is the biggest user of butadiene (synthetic rubber), used specifically in the manufacture of car tires. 

      Butadiene also constitutes around 70% of total nitrile glove costs.

      With car sales in China almost doubling in the last year, the subsequent sharp increase in butadiene price has been passed onto glove manufacturers, who in turn are passing these rising costs to suppliers and consumers.

      "Surging car sales in China have increased the price of butadiene, which constitutes around 70% of nitrile glove costs"

      The President of the Malaysian Rubber Glove Manufacturers Association, which produces more than half of the world’s rubber gloves, has indicated the price of nitrile gloves will have to increase by about 10-12%.

      Eagle has over the years maintained a determined effort to keep prices level so our customers could reliably forecast their budgeted spending. We will endeavour to continue to do this and as such will be absorbing the cost increases for the foreseeable future.

      Why Cheap Disposable Gloves Do NOT Save You Money

      Cost is always a factor in any purchasing decision. With products such as disposable gloves and clothing, there has previously been little reason to think beyond the price. 

      Do you know why some gloves are cheaper than others? In this article, we highlight the true cost of disposable gloves, and why you need to focus on value when purchasing these products, rather than cost alone.

      (WARNING – the following contains information that may shock!)

      1. Raw materials

      Gloves manufactured from cheap, low-quality raw materials can commonly cause skin allergies. Studies have shown that the chemical accelerators and other additives commonly used in the production of nitrile, latex and non-latex gloves can cause Type IV allergy, presenting as chronic dermatitis of the hands and wrists.

      Weakness in gloves is as much a factor of glove quality and raw material choice as it is thickness. So if there are ripping or breakage problems - moving to a thicker glove is not necessarily the best option and increases cost and waste. 
 

      Nitrile gloves made with poor quality raw materials may have increased levels of cyanide within the glove - there is currently no testing for this and no requirement for testing to take place. 


      “….increased levels of cyanide within the glove….”

      To reduce costs, many vinyl gloves contain the inexpensive phthalate plasticizers. These have been found to adversely impact human health and have been added to the California Proposition 65 list of chemicals known to the state of California to cause cancer.

      Read more about vinyl gloves here.

      1. Manufacturing, QC and labour standards

      Do you, or your glove supplier, know where your disposable gloves are manufactured?

      Recent factory audits and investigations have revealed endemic and serious labour rights abuse of workers in glove factories in Thailand, Malaysia, and Sri Lanka. A comprehensive investigative report by the BMA states that “the manufacturer of disposable gloves is at a high risk of labour rights abuse.”

      “The manufacture of disposable gloves is at a high risk of labour rights abuse.”

      The Eagle team visit and audit our factories regularly and, via our Supplier Code of Conduct, verify product quality, staff conditions, and the factory’s environmental footprint. 

      Eagle is also on the journey to becoming Child Labor Free for a core range of products. Child Labor Free conducts independent unannounced spot audits on all aspects of labour conditions, especially child labour.

      1. How many gloves per box?

      Most disposable glove boxes contain 100 gloves. However, a well-known method by manufacturers of reducing costs is to include up to 5-10 less gloves per box, and/or include a number of defective gloves – instantly reducing the cost of goods! 

      “up to 5-10 less gloves per box”

      1. Cost Vs Value.

      Eagle Protect guarantees the best value of disposable gloves and clothing you can buy – quality, competitively priced products that are responsibly sourced. We may not be the cheapest supplier, but we do offer the best value for your money.

      Now that you know the many good reasons why gloves are cheap –you many not want to risk your reputation, customer and staff health by purchasing from unknown sources.

      “we do offer the best value for money” 

      More about Eagle Protect 

      Eagle is the only B Corp certified disposable glove and clothing specialist in the world! Our supplier audits and recent journey towards Child Labor Free certification ensures our products are responsibly sourced with a fully transparent supply chain.

      We are endeavouring to partner with businesses that care enough about their products, their reputation, their staff and their customers, by sourcing their disposable gloves and clothing responsibly.

      Our products are competitively priced and are of the best quality available. Through our expertise and experience, we are a perfect match for your purpose. 

      Visit our store today, to find a disposable glove to suit your business needs.

      Labour Rights Abuse In Glove Manufacturing

       

      In 2015, the BMA Medical Fair and Ethical Trade group convened to tackle labour rights abuse in the medical (disposable) gloves manufacturing industry. Their report “In Good Hands. Tackling labor rights concerns in the manufacture of medical gloves”, highlights that at present this sector should be considered at high risk of labour rights abuse. Download the full BMA report here.

      The manufacture of disposable gloves is a large global industry that produces in the region of 150 billion pairs of glove per year, with a market value of over USD $5 billion. Disposable gloves are primarily used in the healthcare and food industries, with the leading regions of export to the USA, EU and Japan.  

      Factories manufacturing disposable gloves are largely found in Malaysia and Thailand, with a handful of other Asian countries, and are reliant on migrant workers.

      In recent years there have been a number of investigations of labour conditions in the disposable glove industry revealing endemic and serious labour rights abuse of workers in factories. These include both factories manufacturing for small glove suppliers and those manufacturing for major international brands.

      “The manufacture of disposable gloves is at high risk of labour rights abuse.” 

      The report also suggests that those who use, procure, supply, or manufacture medical (disposable) gloves instigate policies and practices to protect workers in the industry.

      Those involved in the supply chain for medical disposable gloves have the power, and some of the responsibility, to protect workers in their supply chain. This includes manufacturers, suppliers, purchasing organizations and end-users.

      Suppliers of disposable gloves have the moral and legal obligation to source products from factories with a commitment to workers rights.

      Most recently, like-minded companies are boycotting the Dhaka Apparel Summit over their worker treatment issues. Companies taking part in this boycott and who represent billions of dollars in trade hope that the move will highlight the seriousness of the situation. Bangladesh relies heavily on the garment industry, which constitutes 80 percent of the country’s exports. 

      The Dhaka Apparel Summit is an opportunity for global partners to discuss building a more sustainable apparel supply chain and is designed to attract a wide spectrum of attendees, including government representatives, economists, brands, employers and workers' representatives.

      Users of disposable gloves also have the power to affect change in this industry, questioning suppliers and demanding transparency in the supply chain of disposable glove manufacturing.

      “Users of disposable gloves also have the power to affect change in this industry, questioning suppliers and demanding transparency in the supply chain of disposable glove manufacturing.”

      Eagle Protect is the world’s only B Corp certified disposable glove and clothing specialist. All our factories are audited regularly, following our Supplier Code of Conduct, and we are proudly on the journey towards Child Labor Free certification for our core range of products. Child Labor Free conduct independent unannounced spot audits on all aspects of labor conditions, especially child labor.

      We are committed to transparency in our supply chain and are endeavoring to partner with businesses that care enough about their products, their reputation, their staff and their customers, by sourcing their disposable glove and clothing responsibly. 

      Why not choose a supplier like Eagle Protect for your disposable goods. Visit our online store today for a wide range of product to suit your business needs. 

      Joining the Journey towards Child Labor Free

       
      Eagle Protect is proudly on the journey towards Child Labor Free certification to the Manufacturing level, for a specific range of our products. Child Labor Free is a global certification system that independently inspects and analyses supply chains for the use of child labour.

      The global supply chains that produce and deliver our products are complex. Many companies don’t know that children are involved in the production of their goods, hidden in complex supply chains which are never openly discussed.

      “Many companies don’t know that children are involved in the production of their goods.”

      More than 150 million children are engaged in child labour globally, being denied the right to their childhood. The power to change this lies with consumers.  

      “The power to change lies with consumers.”

      Child Labor Free certification empowers consumers to recognise brands that do not use child labour. It clearly demonstrates to consumers that brands like Eagle are committed to working through their supply chain to ensure there is no child labour being used in the production of any of their products or service.  

      Alongside our own Eagle Supplier Code of Conduct with regular supplier visits and audits, joining the journey towards Child Labor Free adds further independent factory audits and assessments.

      Eagle is joining this journey because we are committed to transparency in our supply chain. Sourcing our range of disposable gloves and clothing responsibly also provides assurance to your business, protecting your brand and your reputation.

      Visit our online store today to find products to suit your business needs.

      Vinyl Disposable Gloves Can Cause Adverse Health Effects

       

      Up to 50% of Vinyl disposable gloves are made up of plasticisers, which make the PVC flexible and soft enough to wear. Often plasticisers contain phthalates and BPA as they are inexpensive.

      Therefore to reduce cost, many Vinyl gloves contain the phthalate plasticisers DINP (Diisononyl phthalate) and DEHP di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate. Both DiNP and DEHP have been found to adversely impact human health and have been added to the Californian Proposition 65 list of chemicals known to the state of California to cause cancer.

      DEHP is under much scrutiny for its toxicity. Exposure to DEHP has been associated with adverse reproductive, neurobehavioral, and respiratory outcomes in children (Braun et al, 2013; Ejaredar at al 2015) and metabolic disease risk factors such as insulin resistance in adolescents and adults (James-Todd e al. 2012; Trasande and Attina 2015).

      Diet is believed to be the main source of DEHP and other phthalates in the general population - phthalates have been shown to leach from products into the human body via ingestion, inhalation and dermal absorption (Zota et al, 2015).

      Because phthalate plasticisers are not chemically bound to PVC, they can easily leach and evaporate into food, particularly fatty foods such as butter, oils and meat – where they become mostly soluble.

      In one study by Serrano et al. 2014, foods high in fat such as dairy and meat were found to be more contaminated by high-molecular-weight phthalates that are more lipophilic, such as DEHP.

      Studies conducted in Japan found that use of disposable PVC gloves during the preparation and packaging of meals was a major source of dietary intake of DEHP (Tsumura et al 2001a). The same study also demonstrated a decline in DEHP levels in prepared meals after the ban of DEHP in PVC gloves in Japan (Tsumura et al 2003).

      Food is likely contaminated with phthalates and BPA during processing (Cao 2010; Geens et al 2012) from PVC in materials such as PVC (Vinyl) gloves and food packaging materials (Cao 2010; Serrano et al. 2014).

      It is not surprising that Japan has banned PVC gloves for food handling due to the well-documented adverse effects on health.

      However, despite this evidence, the use of Vinyl gloves in restaurants and food-handling facilities remains common practice in the US, often due to historical glove choices and the incorrect perception that Vinyl gloves are a more cost effective option.

      We hope these studies will inform and change business and regulatory glove usage in the food preparation industry, and provide Consumers with the knowledge to make informed decisions and restaurant choices.

      Due to recent advances in the formulation and manufacturing of Nitrile gloves, they are becoming the more popular and cost effective choice of disposable gloves with food processors.

      Eagle Protect stocks a full range of Nitrile disposable glove alternatives.